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1

For all relevant databases, SAP either publishes patches themselves (e.g SAP bundle patches for Oracle) or gives hints (SQL Server) how to patch smoothly. Installing all the new updates instantly is a difficult task and very time consuming if not impossible. So a patching process/workflow should be implemented, for example after every 6 months. A good Change Control Management and Test Management in Solution Manager could support and simplify the process and increase system stability. Of course critical security patches should be installed ASAP.

2

Basis database tables contain a lot of data. Use transaction DB02 to analyze database and tables. Take note that depending on the database in use (HANA, Oracle etc), the menu structure is different. Big tables can cause longer dialog response times, database requires more disk space and moving data (e.g client copies) takes longer. This will be even more important when using an in-memory database like HANA, as bigger tables need more memory and this can get very expensive. Data Volume Management in Solution Manager can be used to get more insight here.

3

Transaction DB13 can be used to check database consistency. The CheckDB job should be scheduled regularly. If it’s not running or gets constantly errors, this should be worked on with a high priority.

4

Missing database indexes can have a huge effect on the SAP system performance. In 80% of the cases, solving these problems will increase performance.

5

EWA reports and recommendations within are ignored. EWA reports are valuable source of information and can give already on a quick look an indication about health status of the system. For example a list of outdated software components. Such proactive checks and monitoring can help preventing costly production downtimes.

6

In a well maintained system SAP standard jobs are running regularly. These jobs mostly “clean up” the system and can be scheduled from SM36. However, new releases and corrections can cause the need for new standard jobs, so also SAP notes should be checked and implemented (e.g 1411877, 1440439).

7

Last but not least, basis operations are not supported or done by blueworks. 🙂

System availability = good basis administration?

Again and again we can help out customers who have some problems in their SAP systems. These problems are usually expressed by reduced performance or general statements from the users “SAP is not working”. How can we recognize whether the basis team has done a good job? Here are our top 7 experiences:

  1. For all relevant databases, SAP either publishes patches themselves (e.g SAP bundle patches for Oracle) or gives hints (SQL Server) how to patch smoothly. Installing all the new updates instantly is a difficult task and very time consuming if not impossible. So a patching process/workflow should be implemented, for example after every 6 months. A good Change Control Management and Test Management in Solution Manager could support and simplify the process and increase system stability. Of course critical security patches should be installed ASAP.
  2. Basis database tables contain a lot of data. Use transaction DB02 to analyze database and tables. Take note that depending on the database in use (HANA, Oracle etc), the menu structure is different. Big tables can cause longer dialog response times, database requires more disk space and moving data (e.g client copies) takes longer. This will be even more important when using an in-memory database like HANA, as bigger tables need more memory and this can get very expensive. Data Volume Management in Solution Manager can be used to get more insight here.
  3. Transaction DB13 can be used to check database consistency. The CheckDB job should be scheduled regularly. If it’s not running or gets constantly errors, this should be worked on with a high priority.
  4. Missing database indexes can have a huge effect on the SAP system performance. In 80% of the cases, solving these problems will increase performance.
  5. EWA reports and recommendations within are ignored. EWA reports are valuable source of information and can give already on a quick look an indication about health status of the system. For example a list of outdated software components. Such proactive checks and monitoring can help preventing costly production downtimes.
  6. In a well maintained system SAP standard jobs are running regularly. These jobs mostly “clean up” the system and can be scheduled from SM36. However, new releases and corrections can cause the need for new standard jobs, so also SAP notes should be checked and implemented (e.g 1411877, 1440439).
  7. Last but not least, basis operations are not supported or done by blueworks. 🙂

If the your systems are in good health, you can take the next step. In SAP Support Launchpad, SAP publishes regularly new notes under SAP HotNews and SAP Security Notes. Reviewing these and implementing relevant corrections periodically will help keep the system up-to-date and secure.

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